ISPs say your Web browsing and app usage history isn’t “sensitive”

ISP lobby groups make case against the FCC’s broadband privacy rules.

And now begins the nit picking argument about language and the meaning of terms in the law that govern enforcement and permitted acts that affect public communications and the Internet.  “Sensitive” is the favorite these days.  Its become the new speak for “privacy”, as if the Fourth Amendment of the US Constitution doesn’t protect a citizens “sensitive” information or property.  Many of our long standing concepts about what is and what is not private are being turned on their heads by changes in surveillance technologies (read: security cameras and recording systems) and the new realities of 21st century living.

Source: ISPs say your Web browsing and app usage history isn’t “sensitive” | Ars Technica

Thanks to Ars Technica

The state of privacy in America

Right or wrong, Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA surveillance have focused attention on the Fourth Amendment and national security in ways that our founding father’s never could have imagined.

After the June 2013 leaks by Edward Snowden about NSA surveillance of Americans’ communications, Pew Research Center began an in-depth exploration of people’s views and behaviors related to privacy. Here’s what we learned.

Source: The state of privacy in America | Pew Research Center

Thanks to Pew Research

America’s Top Spy James Clapper and the Future of Cyberwar and Surveillance

In a rare public article, we hear about the current US position on cyberwar and surveillance.  The interesting question is where we might go with our protections in 2017 and beyond and will Clapper be a part of that effort.

Source: America’s Top Spy James Clapper and the Future of Cyberwar and Surveillance

Thanks to TCIH 2.0 and WIRED

NSA ‘not interested in’ Americans, privacy officer claims

Privacy advocates want Congress to weigh in on a decades-old executive order for spying on foreigners.

The big question is not the target of intellegence, but whether law abiding citizens are having their conversations monitored unlawfully.  This surveillance has yet to be challenged in court and potentially legislated.  the US Constitution IS important and needs to be defended.

Source: NSA ‘not interested in’ Americans, privacy officer claims | TheHill

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Thanks to The Hill

This Week In Data Collection News, And The Privacy Paradox

“As California tightened its digital privacy protections, news involving Google, Pandora and other firms highlighted the way companies increasingly rely on data about their users. How much do we care?

“For nearly a decade now, researchers have tracked this concept known as the “privacy paradox. At its heart is the fact that Web users routinely say that privacy is a big and serious concern, but then don’t actually behave accordingly.”

“There’s a bit of a disconnect between what people say and what they do,” says Ryan Calo, a law professor at the University of Washington who has studied digital market manipulation. He says the paradox is complex and theories that explain it vary. “Maybe they don’t really care? Maybe they just don’t know?” Calo adds.”

The so called privacy paradox is at the center of the conversation between strict constitutionalists, liberals, and hawks who want to beat back the threats at our borders at any cost.

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Source: This Week In Data Collection News, And The Privacy Paradox

Thanks to Data Collection News

California Adopts New Strict Digital Privacy Law

“Law enforcement authorities in California will generally have to get a warrant from judge to compel phone and Internet companies to turn over any digital customer information.”

And now the information and data on your cell phone and computer are considered private, at least in California.  This recent legislation paves the way for a host of new disagreements about lawful and unlawful uses of technology on the Internet and within wireless networks.

And this recent legislation paves the way for a host of new disagreements about what constitutes legal and illegal use AND surveillance of digital technologies.  Just what states will come next, or will they wait for the Presidential election in 2016.

Source: California Adopts New Strict Digital Privacy Law

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Thanks to The Wall Street Journal

With ‘Brandeis’ Project, Darpa Seeks to Advance Privacy Technology

“The new Darpa program is called Brandeis, a nod to the guiding principle of the research initiative. Louis Brandeis, a progressive lawyer who became a Supreme Court justice, was the co-author with Samuel D. Warren of an influential essay, “The Right to Privacy.” Published in Harvard Law Review in 1890, it forcefully made the case that safeguarding privacy was essential to individual freedom.”

Apparently we’ve learned some things from the edward Snowden revelations and the Pentagon is putting a public face on its efforts to understand and practice the need for personal privacy.

Chalk one up for the Constitution.

Source: With ‘Brandeis’ Project, Darpa Seeks to Advance Privacy Technology – The New York Times

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Thanks to The New York Times

Analytics for government: big data and Big Brother

“Transparency and privacy are two key areas where the public sector will not be able to rely on the private sector for innovation”

The gulf between national security surveillance efforts and the publics’ desire for privacy on the Internet continues to widen throughout the world.  As long as cybercrime is a viable “industry”, the situation will continue unabated,

Source: Analytics for government: big data and Big Brother – Telegraph

Thanks to The Telegraph

It’s Time for a 21st Century Debate on Privacy and Surveillance

“The boundaries of privacy have grown very blurry in an age when we practically disrobe at airports, share our inner torments on Facebook and Twitter, don’t mind advertisers’ following us from website to website and happily allow weather and traffic apps to know where we are at all times.”

The surprising truth is that most people – especially those who depend upon “smart” devices to communicate with each other care very little about their privacy or the security of the data and information that they share with anyone.

via It’s Time for a 21st Century Debate on Privacy and Surveillance | The Nation.

Thanks to The Nation

Pirate Bay data now tugged by IP-address-tracking

If you’ve got nothing to hide, then why are you worried about being surveilled?  Is it the principle of the thing?  Stubborness? Or just plain immorality?

“The use of CloudFlare worries some who feel it increases the likelihood of Pirate Bay users being surveilled. Which obviously won’t be a problem for the overwhelming majority of users who use it to access free content or Linux distributions and have nothing to hide.”

 

via Pirate Bay data now tugged by IP-address-tracking current • The Register.

Thanks to The Register – UK