The state of privacy in America

Right or wrong, Edward Snowden’s revelations about NSA surveillance have focused attention on the Fourth Amendment and national security in ways that our founding father’s never could have imagined.

After the June 2013 leaks by Edward Snowden about NSA surveillance of Americans’ communications, Pew Research Center began an in-depth exploration of people’s views and behaviors related to privacy. Here’s what we learned.

Source: The state of privacy in America | Pew Research Center

Thanks to Pew Research

Snowden leaks resulted in no uptick in encrypted terrorist communications, study finds

“Flashpoint Global Partners, a firm that specializes in uncovering threats on the Dark Net and Deep Web and the creator of the study, found that “underlying public encryption methods employed by online jihadists do not appear to have significantly changed since the emergence of Edward Snowden.”On Monday, CIA Director John Brennan bemoaned “unauthorized disclosures” and “hand wringing over the government’s role in the effort to try to uncover terrorists” as reasons why it has become more difficult to identify terrorists. Brennan didn’t explicitly name Snowden in his remarks, but the implication is clear.”

Let’s not throw out the baby with the bathwater over the suggestion that encryption was responsible for the Paris terrorist attacks.  The ubiquity of Internet communications and new media have created a vast system of open and closed networks used by nearly everyone in the world with acess to a smartphone or computer.  Public encryption is but one method of privatizing information,

Source: Snowden leaks resulted in no uptick in encrypted terrorist communications, study finds

Thanks to The  Daily Dot