No such thing as absolute privacy

“There is no such thing as absolute privacy in America; there is no place outside of judicial reach,” Comey said at a Boston College conference on cybersecurity. He made the remark as he discussed the rise of encryption since 2013 disclosures by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden revealed sensitive US spy practices.
“Even our communications with our spouses, with our clergy members, with our attorneys are not absolutely private in America,” Comey added. “In appropriate circumstances, a judge can compel any one of us to testify in court about those very private communications.”
 But, he also said Americans “have a reasonable expectation of privacy in our homes, in our cars, in our devices.
“It is a vital part of being an American. The government cannot invade our privacy without good reason, reviewable in court,” Comey continued.
The privacy conversation continues in 2017 as the White House sends mixed messages.  And new threats to computing devices and TVs remind us to be vigilent and not assume that we are protected from surveillance, hacking, and cyber crime.

FBI Chief Comey on Privacy

Thanks to the FBI and CNN